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Human Genome Project pioneer, Russ Prize recipient Leroy Hood to lecture this Thursday, 12-1:30 p.m.

Leroy Hood, 2011 Russ Prize recipient, will present a lecture as the guest of the Russ College on Thurs., Feb. 23 from 12-1:30 p.m. at the Baker University Center Theatre. Leroy Hood.

A reception will follow immediately from 1:30-2 p.m.

One of the world’s leading scientists in molecular biotechnology and genomics, Hood will present “Systems Biology, Emerging Technologies and the Transformation from Reactive to Proactive (P4) Medicine.”

The talk will cover Hood’s view of biology as an informational science requiring systems approaches, which leads to his conclusion that there are two fundamental types of biological information – the digital genome and environmental signal. Hood will explain how biological complexity is so complex that it must be revealed through perturbations of systems that generate enormous amounts of data.

Hood will then detail his lab’s efforts at a systems approach – via a neurodegenerative disease in mice – to disease. He also will discuss emerging technologies that will transform medicine over the next 10 years, and finally his theory that medicine will ultimately be transformed from its currently reactive state to a proactive, “P4” mode. Hood will argue that such P4 medicine – predictive, personalized, preventive and participatory – will force a revolution of the healthcare industry that will be primarily driven by patients using social networks.

Hood rose to the forefront of the scientific community for his hand in developing the DNA sequencer and synthesizer and the protein synthesizer and sequencer – four instruments that paved the way for the successful mapping of the human genome. He was an instrumental participant on the team that developed and led the Human Genome Project.

Hood has helped establish more than 14 biotechnology companies throughout his career and has 17 honorary degrees from universities in the United States and abroad.

He was awarded the Fritz H. and Dolores H. Russ Prize in 2011 by the National Academy of Engineering.

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